Ongoing Trends in My Vocabulary

Hello, everyone! I have been writing a lot lately, and as a result, I have realized that I employ certain words over and over again in my writing, whether in this blog or for school assignments. Although this realization of my inadequate vocabulary humbled me, it also dawned on me that it could potentially be fascinating to keep track of what words I rely on in my writing on a week-to-week basis. Specifically, I wonder if I will be able to look back on my overly used words and notice how they related to my mindset, knowledge, and experiences at those certain times in my life, which I most likely would not have noticed originally. Therefore, I would like to debut a little experiment regarding myself in which on Fridays I will write out a list of words I found myself repeating extensively in my writing and speech throughout the previous week. I hope that doing so will help me understand myself and my development better, and also could help readers of this blog learn more about who I am as a writer and an individual in general. Additionally, I may decide to add analyses of my diction once I am further removed from the experiences of each week. I hope this experiment will be successful and insightful, and I also hope that those of you reading this post will join me on this journey (and maybe help me out as well).

-Stephanie

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Week of November 11, 2016:

  • Subsequently
  • Validate
  • Aforementioned
  • Perpetuate
  • Quite

This specific week was the week of the election here in the United States, and the results motivated me to write a lot, especially regarding my my opinions and beliefs. My passion (and ability to spend much time writing extracurricularly) led to me posting more on this blog in a week than I ever have to this day, and in those posts, wanting to express my thoughts about how the results of the election impacted me and may impact our country as a whole. As a result, I found myself using the words listed above in an attempt to eloquently show my concern for the future.

Week of November 18, 2016:

  • Prevalent
  • Clearly
  • Experience

My emotions from the previous week died down a bit this week, but the amount of schoolwork intensified, as end-of-semester preparations came into full swing. I went back to posting on this blog once a week, while I directed my attention to my many writing assignments and projects for school. Particularly, I worked on creating analyses of readings I had done for my classes, which is where the words “clearly” and “prevalent” came into play. Also, a couple of my time-consuming assignments during this particular week involved me developing and organizing examples of class material from my own life, which is a major reason why I used the word “experience” quite a bit.

Week of November 25, 2016:

  • Likely
  • Regarding
  • Might
  • Prevalent (2)

Even though this was Thanksgiving week, it was still comprised of much schoolwork, and I had to develop much opinion-based writing. As I am somewhat insecure about the validity of my opinions that I know my intelligent professors will end up reading, I use the words “likely” and “might” quite a bit in general, and particularly employed them excessively this week. My habit of writing in an uncertain way is definitely something I would like to rid of, which I am currently trying to work on. In addition, when explaining my opinions, I utilized the word “regarding” ad nauseam in association with ideas, concepts, and evidence in my writing. Also, I did a significant amount of reading for my psychology class during this week, in which the prevalence of of certain disorders was presented; thus, the word “prevalent” was ubiquitous in my thoughts and writing around this period of time.

Week of December 2, 2016:

  • Provoke
  • Credible
  • Various
  • Insight

With major projects due this particular week that involved much research, I found myself over-using certain words to convey my efforts regarding the different sources I used, including “credible” and “various.” Also, through the word “insight,” I often tried to explain the value of these references. Clearly, I felt a bit insecure about my project; therefore, I felt the need to make it seem as valid as possible. In yet another large writing assignment, “provoke” was employed in accordance with my explanations of how psychological disorders are caused. As one can see, schoolwork was really starting to take overpower my life at this point (which would become a trend). ‘Twas fun.

Week of December 9, 2016:

  • Wide-reaching
  • Effective
  • Particularly
  • Experience (2)
  • Aforementioned (2)

Guess what? If you guessed that I had a few more major projects due this week, then you are correct. For example, I had to write a letter to be sent to an organization, in which I made sure to detail how much I admire their work by using words such as “wide-reaching” and “effective,” and pointing out specifics using the word “particularly.” With other extensive assignments involved with my encounters with the institution, I employed the word “experience” a plethora of times. During this week, I was working with a classmate on a project, and while doing so, my theory that I overuse words that make me feel smarter than I actually am was validated. While writing an email to our professor together, I typed the word “aforementioned” and subsequently was told “You use that word a lot.” I really do enjoy using the word, as shown by the fact that it has been included in two of these lists already.

Week of December 16, 2016:

  • Convey
  • Often
  • Correlation
  • Quite (2)

‘Twas finals week. One of my assignments required me to explain my thoughts about the class and my performance in it; thus, I used the words “convey” and “often” plenty of times. The project I worked on with a partner last week was finally completed this week, and I surely overused the word “correlation” in it, as it involved much analysis of the relationship between the different variables we tested. Lastly, I employed the word “quite” a lot this particular week, likely because of my genuine love for the way it sounds in my head and how it displays my fear of stating that something is unequivocal. My first finals week of college was definitely stressful for me (interestingly, though, it did not require as much writing as I expected), but I made it through.

Week of December 23, 2016:

  • Wonderful
  • Incredibly
  • Today
  • Excited

This was my first full week of winter break; thus, my ability to relax and enjoy my surroundings more became apparent in my diction. For example, I used the word “wonderful” much in relation to a trip to the city I took after the end of the semester of school. In addition, during this time, I started to become enormously (or, “incredibly”) “excited” about my upcoming vacation. Since I finally had the time to plan and build anticipation for it, I used these positive words quite a bit. Lastly, I found myself using the word “today” more than usual; I think that my ability to focus on the present day instead of always looking ahead to due dates lead to my excessive use of the word.

Week of December 30, 2016:

  • Foster
  • ‘Twas
  • Love
  • Should
  • Fairly

One of my favorite weeks of the year had arrived: Christmas week. My excitement for the season and the continuation of traditions and time with my family was shown in my employment of the word “love.” Similarly, I used the word “foster” in relation to my love for Disney, as I was preparing even more for my upcoming vacation. I did show some uncertainty this week, though. For instance, I found myself using the word “fairly” to show the level of skepticism I had of myself (and as a synonym to “quite”– a word I employ excessively), and also asking many questions with the word “should” incorporated into them. On a more random note, I found myself starting to use “’twas” much in my writing, simply because I realized that it would be fun to write and would make me feel smarter than I actually am, which may have been compensation for any uncertainty I had about myself.

Week of January 6, 2017:

  • Excited (2)
  • Magical
  • Gorgeous

This was my week of vacation! I had planned to write a lot while I was away from home, but I must have forgotten how exhausting vacation can be, because I ended up not writing very much. Most of my use of language and writing was apparent in the forms of tweets and talking to others, and I found myself using the word “excited” very much in both of those ways of expression because of how much I was looking forward to this vacation. In case anyone was not aware from my extensive recaps of my vacation, I went to Walt Disney World. As it is known as “The Most Magical Place on Earth,” I said the word “magical” ad nauseam while I was visiting the resort. Lastly, the weather and our surroundings were a beautiful change of pace for me, so I found myself extensively typing the word “gorgeous” while describing my experiences.

Week of January 13, 2017:

  • Afterwards
  • Wonderful (2)
  • Favorite
  • Great
  • Once

I was lucky to have this particular week (and the next one) included in my Winter Break, so I appreciated my extra time off by recovering from vacation. I spent much time relaxing, unpacking, and starting my series “Let’s Take a Vacation” up once again. Most of the words included in this week’s list have to do with writing my recaps of each of my days on vacation. I continued my extensive use of words with positive connotations to describe how satisfied I was with my visit to some of my “favorite” places, with words such as “wonderful” and “great.” In addition, since I was not used to writing recaps, I was surprised by how much I was repeating words such as “afterwards” and “once” to keep the story of each day moving along. I will admit that the prevalence of these words in my recap posts will likely continue to be apparent in the future; I am still working on how to improve the flow of my writing.

Week of January 20, 2017:

  • Anyway
  • Wonderful (3)
  • Stunning
  • After
  • Quite (3)
  • We

My last week of winter break had finally arrived, and it basically revolved around writing my “Let’s Take a Vacation” series. Just like the week before, I used words such as “wonderful” and “stunning” to recount the sights and events of my vacation, which were admittedly starting to deteriorate from my memory. My insecurity about some portions of my recaps was showcased in my overuse of the word “quite,” as I hesitated to describe many situations in an extreme or unquestionable way. I was also trying to become comfortable with narrating entire days in my writing at this time, but the word “after” remained ubiquitous in my posts; I even found myself employing the word “anyway” in many instances so I could get myself back on track when I found myself engaging in details and site notes. Lastly, I used the word “we” substantially more than usual during this particular week, which is likely because I wrote about the experiences of our whole group, which I was somewhat unfamiliar with, because I usually write for and about myself (I know…I must seem so conceited).

Week of January 27, 2017:

  • Dreary
  • Alas
  • Important
  • Interesting
  • Unique
  • Nervous

It was time for my second semester of college to start, which initiated the return of words with less positive connotations to my use of language. I did conclude my “Let’s Take a Vacation” series on the Sunday of this week, which I was proud of, and it resulted in my use of the words “dreary” and “alas” in how I described my journey back home from our vacation destination. It was then time to return my focus to education, though, which was a bit nerve-racking for me (thus the inclusion of the word “nervous” on this week’s list). To add some context, I must state the first week of any particular semester of school is a time that I do not enjoy, as having to become used to a new routine is overwhelming for me. Regardless, and as per usual, introducing myself to my professors and classmates was an activity that I had to partake in on the first day of my classes, which led to my extensive but insecure employment of the words “interesting” and “unique” in regards to my life. Lastly, I was also instructed to write about my perception of one of my classes; I think my subsequent utilization of the word “important” really represents how this first week of the semester felt to me.

Week of February 3, 2017:

  • Well-informed
  • Validation
  • Nervous (2)
  • May
  • Represent

My focus truly returned to schoolwork this week, as I adapted to my new schedule. I gave a speech about myself at the beginning of the week, in which I said the word “represent” a multitude of times in order to convey my modes of explaining who I am. I was quite intimidated by this speech, though, which resulted in my use of the word “nervous.” My insecurity also incarnated itself in the word “may” in my explanations of predictions I made for one of my assignments; I definitely did not want to seem as though I thought my conclusions were indisputable. The fact that I found myself employing the word “validation” (mostly in the blog post I wrote that weekend) similarly demonstrates my apparent subconscious yearning for affirmation at the time. My utilization of the word “well-informed” was noticeable as well, which had to do with both my writing about research and my everlasting attention to insane current events.

Week of February 10, 2017:

  • Excessively
  • Greatly
  • Inspire
  • Empower
  • Opinions

This was another typical school week for me, although it did result in some ideas that I was (and still am) passionate about, which I think is exemplified in the list representing the week. First of all, I had fun writing a post about my habit of nodding my head, which resulted in my implementation of the word “excessively.” In that post and throughout another school-related writing assignment, I caught myself typing out the word “greatly” quite a bit, which showed my embracement of emphasis this particular week. My ardency also related to my preparations for an upcoming speech, which involved much reflection on how I think a particular person has shown an ability to “inspire” and “empower” others (such as yours truly) to share their “opinions.” Stay tuned to find out who the person is; especially if my speech goes well, I will make sure to reveal the subject of it.

Week of February 17, 2017:

  • Both
  • Oblivious
  • Necessarily
  • Credible (2)
  • Communication

You know what they say: “Another week, another batch of writing.” Well, at least that is something I would say, especially regarding this specific week. As per usual, I had to write a lot for my classes; three words included in this week’s list, “both,” “necessarily,” and “credible,” were related to a large assignment I worked on in which I had to analyze and evaluate an article. These words definitely reflected my desire to take all aspects of the article at hand into account and compare expectations and criteria with actual content. “Communication” was a word that had to do with much of my speaking (and writing) for a different class, as discussion about the topic and its different forms was prevalent throughout the week. The discussion made me take notice of how “oblivious” I am about certain uses of communication, and my ability to take notice of my heedlessness was also apparent in my post that week about the Auto Show. Clearly, I wanted to become more self-aware (which is always good for someone like myself to work on).

Week of February 24, 2017:

  • Especially
  • Important (2)
  • Impacts
  • Contrary
  • Article

This specific week was one of much nervousness, as one of my main focuses was my speech that I had been preparing for a couple of weeks. I cannot even imagine how many times I wrote out and spoke the words “important” and “impacts” during the first half of the week, as I spent a lot of time practicing my speech, which was comprised of the aforementioned words. Also, my essay-writing and editing from the previous week had continued on, which concluded with my observation that I utilized the words “especially,” “contrary,” and “article” a multitude of times, once again showing my desire to emphasize various examples that demonstrated the quality of the piece I had to analyze. The word “especially” also made several appearances in the blog post I wrote during this particular week, as I wanted to single out certain characteristics of the situations I wrote about. A week of emphasis and explanations, this was!

Week of March 3, 2017:

  • Perpetual
  • Particularly (2)
  • Specific
  • Regards
  • Generalizations

I am beginning to realize that I have not been very exciting this semester. Basically, what I am trying to say is that this was another week of my usual schoolwork and bits of extracurricular writing; I must acknowledge that I did write multiple posts on this blog, though, which is somewhat unique for me. One of the words on this list, “generalizations,” was utilized quite a bit in one of my posts, as I was trying to express how I view and think of myself as a whole. I found myself employing the words “particularly” and “specific” in my other post, and I find it to be interesting that these words are so contradictory to the aforementioned one regarding conclusions. Some of these words were actually prevalent in my schoolwork as well, as while planning and writing out ideas for one of my classes, I often started out with broad ideas, but then tried to also highlight specifics. Balance! Another word that I used extensively in conjunction one of my classes was “regards,” as I had to write about a number of topics, and thus, I tried to transition between them in ways that would seem at least a little bit eloquent. Lastly, for some reason (which was probably just my love of the word), I thought it would be fun to somehow incorporate the word “perpetual” into my life. As a result, it did end up in my Twitter biography, although I worry that its placement may not make sense to anyone besides myself.

Week of March 10, 2017:

  • Specific (2)
  • Distinct
  • Multitude
  • Such
  • Implementation

I did quite a bit of researching and writing this week, and it incarnated itself in my difficulty to narrow the list of words above down to five (I was unable to do so the next week, though). Much of the research I did was focused on the ideas I developed the week before, and basically all of the words on this list relate to those ideas I was working on for a class of mine. As one can see, my use of the word “specific” carried over from the previous week, and a synonym, “distinct,” became one of my alternatives for it. My desire to acknowledge broad viewpoints, which also continued during this week, was exemplified in my application of the word “multitude,” since there were many aspects of a topic for me to portray. In turn, I employed the word “implementation” in regards to how these specific elements of the topic were brought into existence. Lastly, although I am fairly certain that I did use the word “such” in association with the research I conducted, I know that I surely found myself typing out the word ad nauseam for an analytical writing assignment for a different class. Clearly, most of my writing was academic during this particular week; I wonder if any of you can guess what I was researching (probably not, to be honest).

Week of March 17, 2017:

  • Especially (2)
  • Although
  • Aspects
  • Credible (3)
  • Thus
  • Extensive

It was another week comprised of an abundance of writing and analyzing, as proven by the fact that I could not narrow down the list above to less than six words. First of all, clearly, I found myself using words that have been staples of my diction lately during this particular week, as “especially” and “credible” are words that were included in past lists. Both of these words were greatly incorporated into explanations of sources I had to write for English and speech projects, as were the words “thus” and “although”; I really wanted to try to seem eloquent and rational while working on these important projects. The word “aspects” is one that specifically was associated with a speech I was working on, as I ended up having to quickly make it the focal point of my presentation, so it was one that I utilized excessively. Lastly, almost every piece of writing I worked on during this week, such as my blog post, had the word “extensive” in it, as I believed it to be one that could represent the importance and broadness of the topics I was covering.

Week of March 24, 2017:

  • Instead
  • Really
  • Information
  • Aspects (2)
  • Concept
  • Effective (2)

Yes, my friends, for the second week in a row, I could not cut down my list lower than six words. Many of the same (or similar) projects were my focus for this particular week, which is portrayed in how the word “aspects” was one that I used excessively for the second week in a row. That word was involved with the speech I gave during this week, so of course it was one that I said a multitude of times. My speech was also the primary reason why I said I word usually try to not overuse, “really,” many times during my speech in order to show emphasis; my use of the word “effective” was also a result of my desire to make my points and research regarding my topic of interest come across to my audience. The words “concept,” “information,” and “instead” were all associated with a different, and quite important, project that I worked on for my English class (although “instead” can also be found in this week’s blog post of mine as well). With this project, I needed to both analyze many sources and propose my ideas for our cumulative assignment for the class, so all of this work surrounding my main topic resulted in my overuse of the aforementioned words.

*20-Week Reflection*

Week of March 31, 2017:

  • Immediately
  • Pretentious
  • Iconic
  • Charming

My first college spring break finally arrived, and of course, I did not do anything very exciting. I did write a bit, though, and the second installment of my “Monthly Monday Music Melange” series is what drove me to using the words charming and immediately a noticeable amount of times, as many of the songs I included in the list were endearing ones I found myself loving from my first listen. Besides my writing for this blog and working on school assignments (I know…I am weird), much of my spring break was spent on the internet, and thus, I caught myself describing basically everything as iconic internally. Once again, I know I am weird. Lastly, I tried to be at least somewhat self-aware, and particularly since I started to plan out a speech for one of my classes that would be about NPR, I kept thinking to myself, “I am so pretentious.” (That last sentence pretty much describes my spring break and my entire life, by the way.)

Week of April 7, 2017:

  • Involved
  • Excessively (2)
  • Which
  • Great (2)
  • Associated

It was time to get back to my usual college routine. I had to give a sizable amount of feedback to my peers throughout the week and for multiple classes, so I felt compelled to use the word great a lot. I also caught myself utilizing the words involved, associated, and which ad nauseam; this implementation was due to analyses and explanations I produced throughout the week for my work on my blog (this ongoing post and a new one) and an essay I had to write out. Lastly, I realized during this week that I kept making note of the word excessively, which I predict was due to the fact that I wanted to prove to myself that I know the difference between it and extensively, which for some reason, I was prone to messing up in the past. Here is to improvement (and basic lexicon), my friends!

* Please note that I started to italicize the listed words in my analyses on April 14, 2017*

Week of April 14, 2017:

  • Ambivalent
  • Important (3)
  • Implementation (2)
  • Particularly (3)

This particular week was not too out of the ordinary, if not just a bit more stressful than usual (in contrast to the following week; see below for more detail). A lot of effort and thought was put into my preliminary preparations for my next, and last, performance for my speech class; consequently, I used the words important and ambivalent quite a few times. In doing so, I wanted to show how my strong beliefs that I wanted to portray in my speech were in contrast to those my classmates had at the time, and thus, prove that my speech topic was worthy of approval by my professor. (I must admit, though, that I realized that I used the word ambivalent somewhat incorrectly at times.) Also, I conducted some work of significance for my English class and on an essay for a different course, which both had to do with certain concepts and tactics, and these assignments led me to utilizing the word implementation many times in regards to the topics at hand. Lastly, the word particularly showed up very often in my writing during this week, especially in my analyses I wrote for previous weeks in this post, my actual blog post for the week, and likely in the aforementioned essay as well. Such fun, and such emphasis!

Week of April 21, 2017:

  • Association
  • Hope
  • Regarding (2)
  • Necessary
  • Especially (3)
  • Acknowledge

Contrary to the previous week, the week of April 21, 2017 was kind of crazy, at least in comparison to what my usual weeks are like; in fact, in the notes on my phone, I typed out about the period of time “Weirdest week of insanity and emotions.” Yes, that is about right. Anyway, I did quite a lot of work on a project for my English class (which I am actually currently writing about) during the week, and so the words association and regarding were ones that I used a notable amount of times in hopes of seeming eloquent and knowledgeable. Especially is another word that I have used a multitude of times throughout this semester, and during this week particularly, with it taking form in many of my endeavors, such as the aforementioned project. Speaking of this week’s other work, the word acknowledge was one I implemented ad nauseam in regards to the speech I was organizing and working on. I also wrote a lot of emails to professors throughout the week, which often showcased my desire to be apologetic, humble, and adaptable; as a result, I utilized the words necessary (as in, “if necessary”) many times. Similarly, I found myself typing out the word hope in not only my emails, but also in my blog post for the week. It was definitely an odd and overwhelming week, but I would like to believe that made it through!

Week of April 28, 2017:

  • Association (2)
  • Entity
  • Hopefully
  • Concept (2)

I would say that my life returned to some kind of normalcy during this week, as the end-of-semester work intensified. For instance, I did much work for a speech that I would end up giving the following week, which necessitated creating an annotated works cited page (more like eight pages) and practicing the speech itself; the words association and entity were used quite often by yours truly in regards to these assignments, my topic of choice that the speech revolved around, and the sources I used during my research process. Also, I made more progress on my previously mentioned English project (and a related evaluation I wrote about a presentation), in which I also employed the word entity, in addition to the word concept, in order to explain the topics I targeted during my research and writing. Hopefully is a word I used excessively that I think demonstrates the kind of insecurity I had at the time, as I used it in my blog post for the week, an upcoming post I was working on, my aforementioned English evaluation, and likely in other situations as well. By typing out this word, I wanted to seem genuine and apologetic for any potential errors of mine. Whew.

Week of May 5, 2017:

  • Such (2)
  • Received
  • Harm
  • Knowledge
  • Public
  • Feedback

Lots of writing was had during this particular week, as demonstrated by the relatively long list of words associated with the time period. I spent almost the entire weekend working on a reflection essay for my English class, which drove me to using the words suchknowledge, and public, received, and feedback excessively. All of these words were used in order to showcase all of the work I did for a project, and in hopes of seeming eloquent and self-aware. Also, the speech that I mentioned working on during previous weeks was finally given and reflected on (it was about federal funding for public radio, in case anyone was wondering), and since it was persuasive, I utilized the words harmpublic, and feedback with much purpose behind them. The last word is one that I think aptly represents the entire week; it was time for me to finally (and eagerly) showcase my work and accept evaluations, both from myself and others.

Week of May 12, 2017:

  • Corresponding
  • Actually
  • Conducted
  • Admit
  • Effort

It was almost the end of the semester, and eerily, the amount of schoolwork I had to do was actually decreasing substantially (along with my time management skills). Since much time was available for me to truly invest in my work, I actually spent much of the weekend creating a blog post about my Wikipedia project. Even though the post was fairly similar to an essay I had already written, I created it almost completely from scratch, and in it, I maybe over-utilized the words corresponding, conducted, admit, actually, and effort (yes, the entire list above). The first two words largely had to do with the research that I did for the article that held most of my attention, while the last three were essentially ways for me to show a bit of vulnerability in regards to my work, while still trying to portray the depth of what I did. In addition, I started to write an actual assessment of the English class, in which I also tried to prove my worth as a student by employing the word effort a multitude of times. Whew. No wonder my level of confidence was a major question during the following week.

Week of May 19, 2017:

  • Opportunities
  • Suppose
  • Effective (3)
  • Concise
  • Confidence

My last week of the spring semester arrived! My final exam schedule was actually not very insane; consequently, my time management skills did not improve much from the week before. Regardless, I still did the work that I had to accomplish, and was pretty dedicated to finishing up the semester in a positive way. One of my largest writing assignments was for my speech class, as I was required to answer fifteen critical thinking questions about the course. Within my writing, it became noticeable that I incorporated the words opportunities, effective, and concise quite a few times. By using these words, I hoped to show my greater recognition of ways in which I could improve as a communicator. Also, I used the word confidence a lot, not only in my speech assignment & our subsequent discussion, but also within my blog post for the week; my personal level of said concept was definitely on my mind at the time. Overall, seeing that I had to write and edit a few reflections for my various classes, using my ability to portray my enjoyment and appreciation of the courses I took was a major goal of mine during this particular week. Even so, I did often utilize the word suppose, as my fear of expressing the validity of my efforts unequivocally was apparent. I made it through, though!

Week of May 26, 2017:

  • Nervous (3)
  • Institutions
  • Effective (4)
  • Really (2)
  • Invest
  • Still

This particular week, my friends, was the majority of my eleven-day summer break (I am taking a class this summer). So, please take a second to guess how I spent my brief time off. If you guessed “relaxing,” I am sorry to say that you are incorrect. But, if you thought “freaking out about your future,” congratulations, because you are correct! Seriously, though, I spent most of my week anxiously thinking about my future, both academically and career-wise, as demonstrated by the inclusion of the word nervous in the list above. Since I was still so focused on college at the time, I developed my idea (and corresponding blog post) about my desire to start a greater conversation about community college; within the post, naturally, I utilized the word institutionseffective, and still in regards to my experiences thus far with college. Mentioned in the post is also my idea of starting a podcast of the same name, and I must admit that I actually created a “demo” of sorts for such a program. As I listened to it, it became noticeable that I said the words really and invest quite a few times, in addition to many of the aforementioned words. With my somewhat crazy ideas in mind, I truly wanted to show my dedication and passion for the future through my emphasis-based diction. Of course, I also must mention that I created a challenge that I participated in during the week, which was both fun to write and shows the odd mindset I was in at the time. What a carefree summer break, I suppose!

Week of June 2, 2017:

  • Finally
  • Charming (2)
  • Interest

I calmed down a bit during this particular week, as I was aware that I needed to enjoy my last few days of summer break before my class started on Wednesday. Accordingly, I did not write as much as usual, as the list above reveals (though I did read a lot). I did make sure to continue my “Monthly Monday Music Melange” series on Memorial Day, though, in which I employed the words charming and interest many times; my realization that I had been enjoying particularly endearing music throughout the month of May and desire to express my growing interest in certain musicians necessitated this use. The word finally appeared in that post as well, for similar reasons, in addition to its inclusion in my analyses of previous weeks for this ongoing post of mine. Simply put, I was starting to get back to business during this particular week, although trying to make the most of every summer day while also doing schoolwork was an adjustment.

Week of June 9, 2017:

  • Acknowledge (2)
  • Aforementioned (3)
  • Incompetent
  • Will
  • Well
  • Since

The first full week of my summer class had arrived! Considering the fact that the class was offered as a five-week course over the summer, though, my work toward the main project of the class quickly intensified. In fact, almost all of the six words listed above were used in association with said class.  Much of my writing was for a few sections of the project, which involved much research and decision-making; consequently, I wanted to show my thought process through my use of the words acknowledgeaforementioned, and since. Accordingly, it is also worth noting that my focus on the future (as a result of the intentions of the project) led me to employing words such as will a very noticeable amount of times. Some other communication was had with others, and these hopeful discussions led me to possibly over-utilizing words such as well. On the other hand, though, I became engulfed in a habit of describing myself as incompetent; self-depreciation definitely arose from my increase in responsibility and corresponding desire to not become overconfident.

In the Notes app on my phone, I instructed myself to add that I was looking for excuses to use the word necessitate throughout the week, but to little avail. Take that as you will; I just know that I love that word.

Week of June 16, 2017:

  • Offered
  • Indicated
  • With
  • Since (2)
  • Along
  • Utilized

Once again, my project for the aforementioned summer class was my focus throughout the week. I had to write a paper about a hotel I inspected over the weekend (which I mentioned in my blog post of the week), and that lengthy piece was the reason for much of my utilization of the words in the list above. Considering the goals of the inspection, which mostly involved assessing the quality of the hotel, it is not too surprising that I found myself typing out the words offeredindicated, and along ad nauseam. I also wrote quite a bit for other sections of my overlying project, and these aspects that involved decision-making necessitated my use of the word utilized; overall, though, the course at hand and my bouts of insecurity drove me to constantly justifying every decision I made, hence my heavy employment of the words since and with (as in, “With these…”). Whew.

Similarly to the week before, I wrote a note to myself in order to remind yours truly to state that the word specific just missed the cut for the list above. Details are important, I must say.

Week of June 23, 2017:

  • Offers (2)
  • Option
  • Since (3)
  • Utilized (2)
  • Appropriate
  • Impress

Yes, my friends, the project associated with my class took over my use of language for this particular week as well. Much decision-making was involved, and thus, I could not stop typing out the word option. Accordingly, just as with the week before, my nervousness about my choices led to a considerable amount of justification, as indicated by my use of the words sinceappropriate, and impress; the last two words were involved with how my selections were acceptable for the specific fictitious situation. In addition, as descriptions of my options were another component of the project, my employment of the word offers in regards to the various aspects of the selections I made was apparent. (Note that I decided to mark offers as my second inclusion of that word in these lists, even though the week before, it was in the form of offered; it would have been odd to consider them different words as a whole). Lastly, throughout the week, and especially for a group assignment, for which I obviously volunteered to write on behalf of the group, my use of the word utilized was quite noticeable. Admittedly, it was difficult for me to even avoid including the word throughout this one analysis. It is just a very useful word, what else can I say?

Week of June 30, 2017:

  • Relatively
  • Ensure
  • Which (2)
  • Activity
  • Purpose

The last week of my summer class had arrived; the five weeks (although we actually ended early) really did feel like a much longer period of time, due to the intensity I put into my schoolwork. By the beginning of the week, I was basically done writing for the project, but the minor fixes I made to my work still impacted my diction. For instance, the word which was heavily involved with both the questions I had to write for a section of my project and my overall use of phrases along the lines of “in which” (honestly, it still takes me some time to decide which form of the phrase to use when I do so). Also, while working on a group assignment, I almost became angry with myself for how often I typed out the word ensure, in regards to how an event could be successful. Once I was actually done with my class, my focus turned toward my blog post for the week; how ironic is it, though, that my post ended up being strongly associated with the course? Anyway, the fact that the post was about a little project I had fun with led to my utilization of the words activity and purpose, since I wanted to convey my desire to make not only the project, but also my entire summer as one with motivation and improvement. My employment of the word relatively during this particular week was in association with my blog as well, but pointedly for a post I finished writing at the very start of the week. Ha.

Week of July 7, 2017:

  • Experience (3)
  • Honest
  • Occur
  • With (2)
  • Would
  • Time

My first true week of summer break since May was upon me. What did I do, then? Relax? Become a responsible college student by finding a way to do work for compensation? No; instead, after relaxing for a couple of days (accompanied by guilt), I threw myself into a project on this blog that I had been contemplating the pursuit of for a couple of weeks, once I developed a solid and exciting idea as to how I would accomplish it. This project became a large motive for my writing throughout the week, as I even spent the Fourth of July working on what would become my post entitled “Chicago’s Wellington Hotel.” The post was written in an almost encyclopedic way, thus leading me to employing the words eventuallyoccurwith, and would, in order to explain the timeline of the hotel at hand. (On a side note, figuring out what tense to write in was very frustrating for me.) Another piece associated with this blog motivated me to write thoughtfully, of which I do not believe I should disclose details yet, so I will just state the fact/hint that it led me to typing out the words experience and time on a few occasions. The latter of the words also incarnated itself in the aforementioned blog post, since “at the…” and “over…” were phrases I found myself using quite often between both pieces. As a whole, I was very overwhelmed by the end of the week by all of my writing that I truly wanted to execute well; a few other words did not make the list above (legacyindicates, and apparent), and I wrote in the Notes application on my phone “TIRED OF EVERYTHING” and “THIS ONE WAS A DOOZY.” I love summer break!

Week of July 14, 2017:

  • Particularly (4)
  • Despite
  • Mode
  • Further
  • Time (2)
  • Attraction

Readers should probably know by now that once I start a project, I instantaneously become determined to complete it successfully, even if no one else cares about it (look no further than the blog post at hand). This characteristic of mine was made clear throughout this week, knowing that I spent much of the time period working on my post entitled “The Ferris Wheel: A Perpetual Chicago Staple.” Quite frankly, all of the words in the list above were utilized in association with the post; for instance, the words particularly and time were ways for me to describe the invention and progression of the Ferris wheel. Despite is a word that I realized became a staple for me because of its status as a synonym of sorts to regardless, a word that I had caught myself using ad nauseam before; similarly, I believe I employed the word further often because of my desire to avoid another one of my favorite words, furthermore (I just cannot escape it, I suppose). Although the word attraction largely had to do with the Ferris wheel as the focus of my blog post, to be honest, it also stuck with me due to my recent new wave of appreciation for the song “High Ticket Attractions” by The New Pornographers. Lastly, mode is a word I found myself employing in association with my post recounting my recent Chicago visit, even though I barely knew how to properly use it.

I also took note of my use of words such as published, but excluded them from the list above, since they are words that I essentially utilized out of necessity, rather than style; this reasoning is also why the word wheel is not part of the list.

Week of July 21, 2017:

  • Utilized (3)
  • Progress
  • Due
  • Claimed
  • Clear (2)
  • Terms

Yet another week consisting of work on my “Echoes of the Exposition” series had arrived. I believe this to be the week in which I really began to question myself and my decision to revolve my time around the series (and the post entitled “125 Years of Chicago Crowds on the ‘L’“), which is exemplified by the very long and confusing list of words regarding this particular week that inhabits my personal notes. First of all, I found myself employing the word utilized in many of its forms throughout the blog post at hand, as it fit quite well with my overlying theme of modes of transportation. Progress is another word that became a staple for me, both as a source of motivation and with regards to the development of the ‘L’ in Chicago, of course. A couple of phrases also integrated themselves into my vocabulary, and thus in my blog post of the week, including “due to” (I clearly wanted to rationalize the claims I made) and “in terms of.” Accordingly, since I incorporated quotations into my work, I ended up using the word claimed quite a few times; despite my attempts to resist the word clear for such a reason, in addition to my aforementioned desire to assert the validity of my conclusions, I could not help but harness its power.

Some other words that made their way onto my very lengthy preliminary list are declaredannouncedasmucheven, justdescribes, and transportation, the last of which I excluded because of the reason outlined in my previous analysis. Whew.

Week of July 28, 2017:

  • Even
  • Notion
  • Use
  • Appeal
  • Showcase
  • Entity (2)

Right from studying the ‘L’ transit system to dissecting bits of the history of souvenir postcards, I went! Just as with the previous week, I could not stop noticing the multitude of words I repeated within my work, leading to some frustration with myself. Anyway, after its past inclusion in a preliminary list, even found its way onto an official list of mine; although I tried to decrease my use of the word, its ability to convey emphasis was simply difficult to disregard as I went through the week at hand. Notion is another word that had creeped into my vocabulary over time, but became particularly noticeable within my writing throughout this particular week. Since the tracking of my habits led to a heightened awareness of my preoccupation with the word utilization, I knew that I had to work on replacing it with others of the same sort; my need to describe the reaction of the public to postcards necessitated my employment of the word use, though. Ultimately, these historical reactions became a large component of my blog post, and thus, the appeal that people found in the entity of postcards was apparent. One word experienced a somewhat normal level of inclusion in my writing, but nevertheless, became almost unbearable to type out: showcase. I believe the reasons why I felt so tired of this word to be my application of its many forms (such as showcased and showcases) and my need to introduce the various sources in which I found the information I wanted to portray.

I suppose I have developed a habit of creating extensive lists of my most overused words, as for this week, I made sure to note that I also employed the words handled, suchthus, and demonstrates to great lengths. Can my readers tell that I am really challenging myself with this independent research project of mine? Probably.

Week of August 4, 2017:

  • Indicate (2)
  • Offer (3)
  • Permeates
  • History
  • Hope (2)
  • Purposes (2)

Week of August 11, 2017:

  • Essentially
  • Process
  • General
  • Utilize (4)
  • Reflect
  • Project

*40-Week Reflection*

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10 thoughts on “Ongoing Trends in My Vocabulary

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